Babylonian Cunieform

Cuneiform Offering to the King Sin-Ga-Shid, King of Erech

Found at Warka, the ruin city of the ancient city of Erech, mentioned in Genesis 10:10. This is a votive, cone-shaped phallic symbol, made by the priests of the temple of the Goddess Ishtar, the Goddess of Love, and sold to the visiting pilgrimswho thrust it into a hole between the bricks of the temple wall as an offering to the welfare of the king. Thus a part of the temple income was derived. The inscription read: "For Sin-ga-shid, the mighty hero, King of Erech, King of Amanu, in the temple of the Goddess Ishtar, which he built in the royal residence of his kingdom." The date of this king, and therefore of the cone, is about 2100 B.C.E.

This was made by the priests of the temple of the Goddess Ishtar. Ishtar was known as the Goddess of Love. She promoted "sacred prostitution.", Ishtar was the highest and widest worshipped goddess of the Babylonians. The city of Uruk was one of the biggest places of worship for Ishtar and was even dubbed the "city of courtesans."

Found at Warka. This is a votive tablet made by the priests of the Ishtar Temple and sold to the visiting female pilgrims, who in turn presented it to the temple. The inscription read: "For Sin-ga-shid, the mighty hero, King of Erech, King of Amanu, in the temple of the Goddess Ishtar, which he built in the royal residence of his kingdom." The date of this king, and therefore of the tablet, is about 2100 B.C.E.